It’s a very Mind the Gap May on RTE One!

We’re delighted to be taking over the schedule (well, briefly) on RTE One with two smashing new documentaries on 22nd and 23rd May from our immensely talented producers Jennifer Healy and Anne Heffernan.

Division: The Irish Soccer Split (Wednesday 22nd May, 9:35PM, RTE One) explores how the island of Ireland came to have two football teams, in a riveting story as fractious as the country’s own past. Our once-united, all-island team split during the War of Independence and since then rivalry between the teams has reflected the political and social turmoil on the island.  Featuring insightful interviews with players from North and South: Niall Quinn, Gerry Taggart, Alan McLoughlin, Bryan Hamilton, Don Givens, Allan Hunter, Mick Lawlor and Brian Kerr, together with expert historical commentary and a wealth of video and photographic archive this fascinating film asks what the future holds for the beautiful game on this island.

Producer: Jennifer Healy; Director: Maurice Linnane; DOP: Andrew Cummins; Sound: Stephen Mc Dowell & Mick Cassidy

Emma London Calling Division: The Irish Soccer Split

London Calling (Thursday 23rd May, 10:15PM, RTE One) is the story of 5 Irish Deaf people who are unemployable in Ireland and have moved to the UK, where their deafness is not an issue for employers. While some have settled there, others long to return home to their families. Their choice is between a successful career in London or a disability payment or dole queue in Ireland. Sharon Osborne, Thomas Mulloy, Eoin Burns, Emma Nolan and Joanne Chester share their experiences in this powerful film.

Producer: Anne Heffernan; Director: Garry Keane; DOP: Michael O’Donovan

London Calling – Eoin Burns on Cork 96FM with PJ Coogan

Eoin Burns joined PJ Coogan on The Opinion Line on Cork’s 96FM to talk about our new documentary London Calling.

Below is a full transcript of the interview. You can also listen back to the show here.

Don’t forget to watch London Calling on Thurs 23rd May at 10:15PM on RTE One!

 

PJ: So, you have really impressive qualifications and, as you can see out the window here, the construction industry is thriving in Ireland again now. But you can’t get work here. Is it that employers can’t see past your deafness? Is that what it is?

EB: Really the construction industry, I was told, when I was doing my degree, that the construction industry is more professional in the UK. And I was told to go there and to become chartered, a construction manager, and that possibly I could return to Ireland. But I’m happy with my job in England. The attitude is fantastic; it’s first class.

PJ: To a layman like myself, it would appear that having an engineer that can’t hear anything, might be a problem on a busy construction site. Are there things you need to help you to work?

EB: That’s a good question. Really just because I’m Deaf doesn’t mean that I can’t work. Because I’m a Deaf person I have a very strong visual sense and that compensates. Sometimes the word ‘deaf’ is misleading to be honest. It doesn’t mean that I’m stone deaf. I use my hearing aids to hear. I can hear beeping, like if a truck or whatever is reversing. I can hear that. And before I start a job we always have a safety briefing as well. So I know the drill, do you know what I mean?

PJ: So how different is it to the situation here? How quickly after you went to the UK were you actually able to find work?

EB: Emm… It was easier, and I felt that there was a big difference. Like when I was looking for a job and I was looking online, at companies’ websites and that, I could see these ‘two ticks’ that were on the website and that means that the company is certified to be inclusive, so that means there are no barriers.

EB: The company I’m working with now is very inclusive and I could see this ‘two ticks’ symbol on the corner of the webpage, which meant that that company was certified to be inclusive, etc. And that company had three stages for interviews. The first stage would have been a telephone interview and I said to the company where I work at the moment, I said to them ‘I’m Deaf’, and they said ‘Oh that’s no problem. Come over, fly over. We’ll pay for your flight.’ And that’s what happened. I’ve had to fly over to other companies for ‘telephone’ interviews, even though… I had to be physically there and I had to pay for the flights myself. Most of the companies are much more inclusive.

PJ: Obviously you need an interpreter for meetings and things and there’s funding there. That’s the fascinating part, there’s very generous funding there in Britain.

EB: It’s the polar opposite to what we have in Ireland. We don’t have any scheme like that here. And I’m gutted for Deaf people in Ireland, and people with disabilities as well, because they need those kinds of supports…

PJ: Sorry to interrupt. How does it work? You need an interpreter all the time. How is it organised?

EB: It’s very simple. I look at my upcoming meetings, and then I identify which meetings I’m going to need an interpreter for, or an electronic notetaker. And then what I do is I contact the interpreters and the notetakers directly and I ask them if they’re available. And I sign a booking form and then the company pays for that afterwards, and then I claim back the funding from the government. And it’s all paid for; we don’t pay a penny towards it. And it’s extremely fantastic.

PJ: And how easy is to get an interpreter? Say if you had a meeting tomorrow at midday, how would you get an interpreter?

EB: Because I work in London – it’s a global city, like, there’s 8 million people there – so there are plenty of interpreters. At the same time I can see your point. I have to be proactive, so I have to look in advance and then sometimes if there is a last minute meeting I’m able to get interpreters sometimes and sometimes I’m not. So it’s kind of luck of the draw. So if it’s short notice, it depends.

PJ: And your employers are quite happy to allow you keep… book stuff in advance, and they’ll work your schedule around for you?

EB: Well, I suppose it’s just normal stuff: sometimes meetings get cancelled, and sometimes the meetings get moved. And I’m able to make those adjustments to suit the interpreter. My employer knows that; they’re aware of the logistics of organising that.

PJ: Now if you had to do the same thing here, Eoin, would you be able to do it? Would there be the availability of interpreters for example?

EB: Well, there probably would be interpreters available, the big question is who would pay for it? That’s my big question. I mean, it’s proven to work in the UK and it’s worked in the UK for so long and the quality of Deaf people has proven that it can work. What more convincing do the authorities need in Ireland?

PJ: If you had to use, say, another public service in the UK, like if you had to go to hospital, for example, would you have an interpreter there?

EB: Absolutely. When I book an appointment, there’s a form that asks whether I need support or not. Or the person behind the counter might ask me ‘Do you want an interpreter?’, and then I’m like ‘Yes or no’. But I just kind of laugh at how easy and how good it is. And here in Ireland it has happened once or twice before, credit to the public authorities here, but in the UK, it’s mainstream and it’s by default.

PJ: In other words it doesn’t cost them a second thought; this is how they work.

EB: They’re just aware that it’s there. And they’ve got… BSL is recognised over there, and that contributes to the attitude. I’m very encouraged to see ISL recognised here in Ireland in the last couple of years. So, I have a feeling and a big hope as well that the tide is turning and that we can replicate and study the UK model.

PJ: But we need to come so much into the present day. We are very much behind, aren’t we?

EB: Yes. I feel like we’re treated like third class citizens. And I don’t understand why that is. We’ve been through the education system, we’ve proven that we can match our hearing peers, and then when it comes to the workplace, all our hard work… you know, we just meet with a wall after all that hard work. So the government needs to knock down that wall.

PJ: Clearly this documentary, London Calling, is a very important piece of television, and you’d like everybody to watch it, right?

EB: Yes, please, please yes. It’s great… like, I don’t want a ripple effect, I want shock waves. It’s the time for everyone to smell the coffee. You know, it really is a no brainer. So I don’t know what’s stopping us from doing it.

PJ: Well Eoin, thank you very much for coming in today. Thank you Suzanne for your translation and your interpretation. And I wish you the best of luck in your career. I hope… I’m sure that one day you hope you’d be able to move home and work in Cork at the same level.

EB: Hopefully. Yeah. Thanks very much.

 

 

My Tribe – New Bi-lingual Music Subcultures Series

Brand new four-part bi-lingual series My Tribe reveals the underground worlds of some of music’s most defining youth culture movements – the Rockabillies, the Mods, the Skinheads and the Punks. It takes the viewer inside these scenes where music is life, clothing is precise, and attitude is everything. The series delves into the archives to reveal the fascinating origins of these subcultures while also meeting the modern-day members of these tribes to find out what makes them so enduring. This is the definitive story of Ireland’s musical tribes from the 1950s to today, sound-tracked by the essential anthems of these scenes including songs by Bill Haley, The Jam, The Specials and The Undertones.

My Tribe was produced by Jennifer Healy, directed by Conor O’Mahony, shot by Andrew Cummins and edited by Eamonn Power, with narration by Peter Coonan. The series takes the viewer behind the sensationalist newspaper headlines to discover the real Rockabillies, Mods, Skinheads and Punks and the passion, dedication and sense of belonging that their tribe gives them. These are worlds that are rarely seen or experienced on Irish television, lifting the lid on the underground scenes of these fascinating subcultures.

My Tribe – MO THREIBH
MONDAYS @ 7.30PM from 25th march 2019 ON RTÉOne
(Repeat on Sundays @1.10pm pm RTÉOne)

Produced by Mind the Gap Films for RTÉOne with funding from the Broadcasting Authority of Ireland Sound and Vision scheme and Section 481.

 

Mother Father Deaf

Producer Anne Heffernan and Sundance-nominated Director Garry Keane’s latest project is insightful, moving and powerful documentary Mother Father Deaf. The programme explores the world of CODAs – Children of Deaf Adults. Three CODAs and their families describe what it’s like to be brought up in both the Deaf and hearing worlds. Mother Father Deaf was broadcast on RTÉOne in March 2019, with simultaneous fully signed version on the RTÉ player.

 

Our new series Healthy Appetite!

New 8 part series all about fabulous food starts 18th April 2018, 8:30pm on RTE One.

Brendan O'Connor's Cutting Edge

Brendan O’Connor’s Cutting Edge is Back!

Our IFTA-winning series Brendan O’Connor’s Cutting Edge returns to RTÉ on Wednesday 22nd March at 9:35PM.

Sarah Jame Moloney & Family

New documentary Deafening

Thursday 2nd March, 10:15PM, RTE One
‘Deafening’ challenges the viewer to experience the world through the eyes of four Deaf people with uniquely different lives.

Fireworks

Happy 2017 from all at Mind the Gap Films!

Fireworks

We’re delighted to be kicking off the new year with the news that Lords & Ladles has received funding from the BAI for our third series! Catherine Fulvio, Derry Clarke and Paul Flynn will be hitting the road again later this year, visiting more of Ireland’s stunning great houses and tackling plenty of brilliant and baffling historical recipes.

We’re finishing post production on a new documentary for RTÉ One about the experiences of Deaf and Hard of Hearing people living in Ireland, produced by Anne Heffernan, directed by Garry Keane and shot by Michael O’Donovan, that will be making it to screens very soon.

We have more exciting projects in development and we’re looking forward to a busy year. We’d like to wish all our colleagues and our viewers a very happy, prosperous and peaceful new year!

A Fish Pond Lords & Ladles

That’s a Wrap

Our second series of Lords & Ladles came to a close on RTÉ One yesterday. Our last episode was in the stunning Enniscoe House in North Mayo.

IFTA Brendan O'Connor's Cutting Edge

October is Awards Season

We’ve had an exciting few weeks between the IFTAs and the Radharc Awards!